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20121225
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sf and the pg&e offering and i don't know if that is sort of -- you talked about that internally i imagine but i think that would be a very important part of the roll out plan and the outreach plan is when that pg&e offering does come online how it will be talked about to the tar communities and the other groups that we will bring in down the road and i wanted to highlight that. i think that's important piece of the outreach program is how -- while staying within the bounds of the code of conduct -- >> right. >> how do we that and the 100% renewable and the 20% offering and really shows this is about a clean energy future. >> right and we will have the challenge of holding a potential customer's attention long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducti
seen complaints about investigative files. i don't know how explicit this particular document should be about complaints, files and related documents. i just don't want anyone to interpret any more or less from this language than is appropriate. i am not sure that i am prepared to think through whether an investigation under these regs is the same as an investigation under 6.99-13 whether it's an investigative file as law enforcement agency, how it deals with rivera. all of those issues, i suspect, if we ever have a referral or have an investigation and generate these files, somebody is going to say let me see them. and then we're going to go back and forth about whether it is or isn't. i'm just trying to anticipate that now and have language in here or different language shall be disclosed as necessary or under cpra or sunshine, which isn't necessarily the most helpful. i mean it's true, but what does that mean? >> so you would propose to strike it entirely? >> i am struggling and i'm not quite sure what the best answer is, frankly. i am expressing a concern about it. and i suspec
to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the jails and prisons as a joke, really. they don't, i have been sober 23 years and incarcerated in a lot of the 1980's -- [applause] >> thanks, listen, i hope some day we reach a point where that's not necessary to applaud for. i really do. 23 years sober means that i have run out of excuses to misbehave. that's all it means. i'm criminal by nature. i'm challenged by generically designed. i'm a comedian by trade. i love the effort that it takes to make this disease, alcoholism addiction co-dependency, the trifecta of dysfunction that comes from a family source that's really nothing to make fun of. i make a living during humor about a disease that kills more people than car accidents, cancer and war combined, over 92% of incarcerated individuals have a drug or alcohol history or a thread in their family. i'm one of those kids, oldest of five kids in a very dysfunctional family. a.d.d. in our house stood for all different dads. [laughter] >> normal people don't laugh at that at all. they don't laugh at that at all. i get a huge response from th
are in survival mode. they don't know what the future's going to be like. they can't get access to capital. customers are scared to death. we are doing stupid thing like converting corn to fuel, we are sitting on great oil reserves, natural gas, doing nothing with it. we are building solar plants in the west. it is the stupidest thing i've ever heard in my life. neil: i am going to hold you down to a maybe on green energy. [laughter] you have been a bipartisan on pitol hill. wasting time as we pile $4 billion of debt every day. they are waiting for november for some closure. when you think happens when? >> the most dangerous thing in the world is a lame-duck session. they cram every bill with junk. so if you don't have the money, don't spend it. we have to retreat and backup away from this and try to get our priorities in line. if this was a business, we would fire the president can fire the ceo because he dooesn't know how to generate a profit or engage people to solve problems. neil: is that the president order is keep bashing capitalism? do they go to bar the other way? >> i think that
write-in or not? >> i don't like terminating the end of that sentence. >> presumably someone who has qualified -- that is the point i wanted to make more globally. the problem is the state law definition of "candidate." we can add this section in local law, which is fine and whatever version ends up tonight or thereafter will work for the moment. but i think we should urge the state legislature to include an appointed office-holder, because that was the route of this to begin with. >> that we definitely can't do tonight? >> no, it's not on the calendar, but something that we could contemplate in future and i would suspect there is support for that. >> do you have other comments about what we can do here and now? >> sorry. thank you for bringing me back. i agree that the language in lines 19 and 20 are somewhat problematic. i don't know that they work into line 16-18. i think they really only apply in subsection b. i mean it's difficult to read 16-18 and imports 19 and 20 in, that the "order to support" language. it just gets a little circular, but i do agree that support shoul
: thank you. >> about the categorical exemptions. >> president chiu: thank you. why don't we continue and continue the clock as well. >> howard shaf ner president speaking to the nuts and bolts that supervisor wiener asked about, first of all, in our briefing i think we've dealt with that quite a bit, and also briefing from our council. but first of all, you can't have categorical exemption when there's cumulative impact with another project and that would be the case with the masonic -- project. the planning department itself sis in their brief the cumulative impact is the streets and their vicinity affected by the project. masonic is the major north-south thoroughfare and fell and oak are the major east-west thoroughfares. masonic has 32,000 motor vehicles a day it's a few blocks from baker street. in fact, they were going to remove a bus stop on central, which is only one block from masonic. the masonic project would remove all street parking on both sides of masonic for over half a mile including through fell street around 171 parking spaces reduce travel lanes on masonic during m
of you shouldn't vote. because o some of you don't know much. >> do you know who this is? >> looks like will ferrell. john: do you both? maybe you shouldn't if you don't know who these people are. >speaker you are correct. john: your instinct is probably wrong. that's our show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. [applauding] john: what does your brain tl you that america should do about our problem? we have plenty. a lot of people are poor. we should spread the wealth around. i hear busesses raise prices and gouge people. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ought to be a law, government ought to do something. that's just the way pple think, it's instinct. i have to admit how i used to think, took me decades to realize i was wrong, passing a law often does more harm than good. and progress comes from millions of individuals acting to make themselves better off guided by an invisible hand that inadvertently helps others. not to viewers of the "stossel" show, but to normal people. when there is a problem, government should address it. my next guest says they know wha
words, come and see. that's about as low a commitment as you can ask, just check us out. we say you don't have to say anything, sign anything, sacrifice anything, just check out us out. >> american is going through a slight down draw, if you like, in attendance in churches. 1 in 5 are now religiously affiliated. 1 in 3 under 30 are religiously unaffiliated. now, britain, for example, far worse statistics than that. so america remains a very religious country, but why do you think it's on decline? >> there are three different factors. one factor is the actual number of atheists in the country has remained the same since 1950, but they're simply more vocal. that is true. second, some of the surveys out there asking questions are asking the wrong questions. i think there was a pew survey that asked a question about protestantism, and then there was a big article saying the decline and fall of christian america, and it said protestants in america have dropped precipitously. of course they have. i don't know a single person who calls themselves protestant. sometimes the question may be wrong
. >> okay. or visa versa, if it comes through sunshine and they don't like that and they come directly to us. it would be, i think, helpful to have language that would prevent that. because i don't think we want to handle the same complaint twice or have it go through both processes, if we don't have to. i mean, are there pitfalls there that i am missing about that? >> just one comment, chair. i think it would be difficult in the ethics commission regulations to address what the task force would do in terms of what it would hear, even if it is something that has been considered by us already. i think that may not be received necessarily well. >> and we couldn't enforce that anyway. >> right. at least one of those two eventualities we may not be able to address in these regulations. >> but what we could do is say that we will not take up a referral from the task force that has already adjudicated pursuant to chapter 3. >> right. right as a practical matter if we already decide there had is nothing there, even filed directly with us and went to the task force and got a referral back to us
is not red or blue. it's going to be american, and we don't want it. >> and we don't want to cash in our chips, but that's the final hand. our thanks to all of our guests for being here and to you for watching. on behalf of all the folks at "ac 360" and cnn, i'm tom foreman wishing you all of the best and none of the worst in 2013. >>> tonight, finding faith and purpose this holiday season. >> there's so much bad news in the world. we need good news. >> america's pastor rick warren joins me. >> people say i fell out of love. that's your choice. >> he talks religion, reason, and what america needs now. >> the good life isn't good enough. what you need is the better life. >> the election, the economy, same-sex marriage and more, to the issues that really matter. >> you know why we have to change the constitution? it was a flawed document. it was made by men. >> what does god mean to you? this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening, and happy holidays and welcome to a special "piers morgan tonight." joining me, one of the most influential speechtual leaders in the world, rick warren. we
biography we are in the same boat. i have been writing about lyndon johnson so long that people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. the one reason i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just as i didn't think of the power brokers being about robert moses, i never had the slightest interest in writing the book just to tell the wife of a famous man. from the moment i first thought of doing books i thought of biographies, i thought of biographies as a way of examining the great forces that shape the times that they live-and particularly political power. why is political power so important? we live in a democracy so ultimately we have the power and the votes we carry to the ballot boxes and the more that we know about how political power really works, not as it is taught in textbooks and colleges but the raw naked reality of political power, the better our votes should be and the better our countries should be and lyndon johnson was the right man to examine political power. he was such a genius in the use of it, bending congress and washingt
, they actually got negative circumstances of neglect. i don't have a single female patient in the downtown eastside who wasn't sexually abused, for example, as were many of the men, or abused, neglected and abandoned serially, over and over again. and that's what sets up the brain biology of addiction. in other words, the addiction is related both psychologically, in terms of emotional pain relief, and neurobiological development to early adversity. >> what does the title of your book mean, in the realm of hungry ghosts? >> well, it's a buddhist phrase. in the buddhists' psychology, there are a number of realms that human beings cycle through, all of us. one is the human realm, which is our ordinary selves. the hell realm is that of unbearable rage, fear, you know, these emotions that are difficult to handle. the animal realm is our instincts and our id and our passions. now, the hungry ghost realm, the creatures in it are depicted as people with large empty bellies, small mouths and scrawny thin necks. they can never get enough satisfaction. they can never fill their bellies. they're alwa
and this makes us richard? >> people don't get that. one could argue the uniforms were not manufactured in china, but grown in the soybean market and i was. they get better wages we have lower prices. john: if made in america of people would be poor. another myth. overpopulation. asia is four. africa is for. >> the problem is not there are too many people but they don't have fried government's. look at the population data. i hear about nigeria because of of -- overpopulation. they have 174 people per square mile. that is half of the netherlands and they are rich. one-tenth of hongkong and singapore and they are really which. >> the resource is the mind. john: more people more brains. >> more people closer together means more conversations. john: i have been told we're running out of fuel. jimmy carter said that. it would have been within the next decade, 30 years ago. >> that implies a prices should be rising. of decades oil has been getting cheaper and cheaper. even if it does get cheaper people look for a substitute. they keep inventing new ways to take more oil. have much more stores of oil t
. leave him alone. >> he changed his e-mail address on the, by the way. spent i don't know what your e-mail is. >> both of you change your e-mail address on it. i hadn't planned to say anything but since i'm late, my publisher, editor at eagle told me it would be polite for me to say something. so i just want to for startup i think it's all human events fault that i was late. that's the most important thing. it's not my fault. and thank you so much for all come tonight. sensuality anything about this in any of the mainstream media, except the view, love those gals. i really, really do love them because everything they were saying is everything released by the near times. but "the new york times" is too chicken to argue with me about it. and without sounding like this paranoid, i've never had a book as ignored by the mainstream media as this book. my first book i did a series of morning interviews. this one, they won't even attack me when i'm out, not there, which is what they usually do. know, this one they do not want you to read because it is, it's an emergency book. i wanted it to c
that you take the task force recommendation on its own. you can choose to, but i don't think there should be a regthat provides in the absence of a commission decision to the contrary. i think there are really different powers and duties and i wouldn't want to complete those. i think i have said enough for the moment. thanks. >> respectfully i disagreeing with member pillpa with respect to burden of proof, with respect to chapter 2. the fact that the matter has been referred from the task force means that the task force has found a violation. perhaps a willful one. and i think that the burden of proof should definitely rest with the resplendent in that case. as a matter of fact, i think that if you recall, when the task force refers we're not looking for re-adjudication. again, we have five new members and it's possible that consensus would change. but when this matter has come before you, before us, with the task force previously constituted, the consensus and a very strong consensus of the task force has been we're not sending matters to you for readjudication. we're sending them for e
their world apart. but we don't care. because it is making us rich. >> that's right. every year congress gives the fossil fuel industry over $10 billion in subsidies. that is your tax dollars lining our pockets, making a fortune, devoiding your kid's future. at exxon that is what we call good business. melissa: joining me now in a fox business exclusive is the executive director of oil change international. it is one of the groups behind the ad. steve, welcome to the show. >> thanks so much for having me. melissa: i understand that this is a parody and it is meant to start the discussion and that's why we're having you on tonight and i'm going to rise right to the bait and tell you as a mom of small kids and someone who follows industry closely i'm totally offended how disingenuous the words in your ad are. let's start with some of them. you say congress gives the fossil fuel industries, 10 dal billion your subsidies? no they're not. they're exxon hard-earned profit. not giving them to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. instead they're allowed to hang
a billion hits? this is awesome how many people are watching this. fantastic. social media. >> they don't make money selling cds anymore. evendown loads from itunes. it is all about the, wow, can't talk. melissa: if i could only get a sliver of those people to buy my book i would be all set. >> everyone bought it. melissa: it is doing well but not a billion people. not a billion people. all right. that's all the "money" we have got for you today. we'll see you back here tomorrow gerri: hello, everybody, i'm gerri willis. one of the big issues congress is promising to tackle is immigration. congress passed the jobs act replaces green card lottery to permanent visas to those with doctorates in science, technology, engineering and math. two outgoing republican senators introducing legislation granting residence to those bought in the country illegally. though call it the achieve act, similar to the d.r.e.a.m. act. i spoke to one. bill's cosponsors, senator kay bailey hutchison. welcome to you here. how is your legislation different than the d.r.e.a.m. act? >> our legislation gives legal st
the shutters, open and see a little bit more of a character. for me, i don't know about you, but the great thing when you make a new friendship is the discovery of that person. it's that that's wonderful. i try to let the audience do that with the character, so you keep some things in and slowly let them out so that that's the fascinating area in a character. so enigma secrets are, for me, very useful. tavis: beyond that, has the process that you use for choosing the kinds of roles that you want to play, has that process changed as you get older? we were talking earlier about playing an older character. but as you age, as i quote my grandmother all the time, as you become more chronologically gifted, has your process for choosing what you want to do changed? >> not really. i choose with my gut. i'll read a story and think, yeah, i like that story. i'd love to go and see that story; i'm interested by that character today, now. two years ago, that might have been different. two years hence that might be different. it depends what your appetite is wanting. if you read a story or a character t
packed manger square in bethlehem. >>> authorities in western new york still don't know why an ex-con set fire to his house and then shot firefighters as they arrived two died in the ambush and two others were wounded. jim axelrod reports. >> reporter: as the four firemen arrived to fight the fire, they were met with gunshots. >> we are being shot at. multiple firemen shot. i am shot. >> reporter: two of the men died instantly. two were wounded. >> be advised i'm snuck the lower leg, the knee area and the lower left back. >> reporter: the gunshots prevented the first responders from putting out the fire. seven homes were consumed by the flames. >> it is still an active investigation, but at first blush it appears that it was a trap. >> reporter: the webster police chief said that william spengler likely set the fire intentionally and waited to ambush the first responders. spengler spent 17 years in prison for beating his grandmother to death with a hammer in 1980. when police surrounded his position monday, he shot himself. the flag at the webster fire departmen
... i was shocked. i--it was--i felt like my head exploded. i mean, i don't think if he had told me he was an alien i could've been more surprised. he said that the firm had liabilities of $50 billion. it never occurred to me that his business had anything like that kind of-- anything like that under management. it was--it was shocking. >> your mother, what was her reaction? >> she looked-- she looked shocked. she asked, "what's a ponzi scheme?" was her first question. she didn't even understand that. i think it was me who answered and said that it means that it's all fake. that dad's--you know, is-- he's not been doing what he says he's been doing. and he followed that up and said, "yes, i've been lying to all of you all of these years. i've been lying to everybody. i've been lying to myself," he said. >> and your brother? >> my brother was trembling with rage. he was absolutely furious. mark was the first one to stand up and said, you know, "i'm out of here." and he stormed out of the room. and i immediately followed him and walked out. >> you know, there's a lot of people out there
. our guest is dishing out tips on cutting the expense. why he says you don't have to be at the top of your class to find a top scholarship. and, let the holiday movie season commence. a review of some of the biggest and smallest flicks to hit the big screen in the coming months. nonprofit organizations are facing a big dilemna: many of their donors are elderly, in poor health and there are fewer of them each year, and there aren't enough new donors to pick up the slack. in our cover story, how one non-profit is using business strategies to make a difference. the privately-funded pritzker military library is one of chicago's best-kept secrets. "our biggest problem is no one knows we're here." but the pritzker is changing that, promoting social media to participate in live presentations on subjects you might think would be of little interest to the "connected generation" - the war of 1812's bicentential. "a friend of mine invited me. i had no idea about the war of 1812. it was a unique opportunity." pritzker prompts thousands of facebook hits, tweets and anything else kenneth clarke,
you are daoeg with the mental health community i don't think that using tasers on them, unless the circumstances is the best way to go about it. >> thank you. >> >> before the next speaker i will call out a few more karls. >> wilson, miller, alicia rubin aver and cavera and perez and buller. >> thanks. >> hello, my name is gary and i am from the san francisco drug users union and my comment is going to be short and sweet. this argument over non-lethal tasers and non-lethal protection for the officers and up against the mentally ill and challenged, has been going on for years. tasers are as lethal as any gun, a gun is just as non-lethal as a tase and her if you spent half of the money that you have spent on conversation, debates ps, surveys and documentation and a little meetings like this, back into the mental health facility and the hospitals and the non-the homeless shelters and get these people off the street, these officers are going to have not have half of the problems that is where the money should be going instead of the ridiculous conversations. thank you. >> thank you
stop putting behind bars? who is the people who really don't belong there? it's people whose only offense is possession of a substance to put in their own body, right? that's the first group that needs to be let out. [applause] >> marty, let me ask you, you're obviously part of the california district attorney's association, as we were talking before the panel began, you shared with me that your organization has previously supported a measure that mark leno brought forward to lower the punishment for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a misdemeanor to an infraction. in this case your organization is essentially opposed to it. what do you say to mr. adelman and mr. gascon? >> i think one of the things i want to point out is that in terms of the changes currently taking place in california's criminal justice system is that we have embarked on a very, very large experiment and that's called realignment. prison population in california is going to approach by -- or sometime next year the federal mandate of 130,000. we've already released some 50,000 individuals to serve
. if you don't want to be part of the cleanpower sf program and you tell us that there is no departure charge that a customer incurs that we are charging. after the program is launched if you then decide -- oh i got my first cleanpower sf bill. i don't want to be part of this program. we are still as the city saying there is no charge to depart from the program at that point. pg&e doesn't have a fee to exit the program during that portion of the time either. >> they don't have a fee that charge it's. >> the fee that we do include and maybe what you're referring to is the cost responsibility surcharge where if a customer leaves pg&e's bundedel service and comes to a cca pg&e will take a portion of the fees they used to charge that customer and those fees will follow the customer so the bill premiums that i am showing here include that as part of the premium so this is all in image of how your bill changes even though it's something we're not charging and pg&e is charging and they joined the program we're including in the numbers so it's transparent to customers. >> and that fee is r
long enough, there won't be any penalty? >> how long is that list? >> non-filers? >> i don't think we know. there are different people that or on the list? >> you are talking about [kpao-eupbg/] combining three or four different lists? >> correct. >> i think that is worth putting on our list on the website. >> and if i could conclude my last comment for the evening hopefully. is the commission intending to meet in december or is that meeting going to get canceled? >> it's going to get canceled. >> excellent. happy holidays to everybody. >> happy holidays to you. >> next item on the agenda is discussion of items for future meetings. hearing none, is there a motion to adjourn the meeting? >> so moved. >> second. >> do we need public comment? is that what you are saying? is there any more public ghent? no public comment. >> he said he wasn't going to make anymore. >> all in favor? >> aye. >> opposed? none. the meeting is adjourned. >> good morning and welcome to the regularly scheduled meeting of the city operations and neighborhood services committee. i am sean elsbe
even though you are younger than i am you have you have been a mentor to me on the board we don't always agree on thing but you have always been there everyday i needed help, advise and there have been times when we disagreed and i remember after the nudity hearing and committee when someone announced that we were a block and they agree on he have gone and that might be true for me and carmen i think we good agree on a lot of stuff but sean and i have disagreements they are always lopsided votes and there was the dogs in the golden gate area and we had a spirited debate about that and then there was the only time that i have been at the losing end of a ten to when vote was a routine procedural vote to split the file on prop d that time and sean was a little i couldn't remembery with me that day because it was a final significant to pull out a cell phone appeal from our strict and that appeal came up and low and behold it got scheduled on sean's birth day and he was grumpy with me and we tosselled over that and i loss ten to one and so whether we are on the same side or are havin
don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i can't totally reminded about all the people who have lived there before and particularly all of the women. >> first lady and fluid and image, a new series on c-span, produced in collaboration with the white house historical association starting presidents' day, february 8 team. the >> president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's careers in business and politics, which included ventures on wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. >> thank you all. as i tell my history students -- [inaudible] as i tell my histories of it until i went to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air, the fragrance, but where foreigners in a strange way. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writin
the festival wednesday. we are having a great time. we don't end until sunday. there's programs in the floppy. with a few big ones up if you're interested in other events. in this german sunday. [applause] following me to the podium will be the mayor of fairfax city, race silverthorne houle introduced a nice case. we are going to keep things to a minimum and shift to formality staff. he's going to read, take questions from cars that some of you filled out an answer those and then read again. then we would do the presentation and then he will be done. bookstore will be open in the lobby if you haven't had a chance to buy one of the present looks. so here's the mayor. [applause] >> at evening, ladies and gentlemen and distinguished guests. it's been 15 years since the possibilities of the book festival at george mason university was first discussed. the city was one of the initial founders of the festival this protagonist order of the festival percents. in the past seven years, then stage and indirect fairfax or local businesses, old town hall county museum visitor center and the city of fairfa
washington after whom we became a country. what are the lessons of history. i don't study it because it's an interesting habit. i study to better understand the present and future engage in making history by intelligent and informed citizens. what are some of the lessons? let me start with the fiscal cliff. sky an obviously question. how many of you heard the term fiscal cliff? [laughter] i want to say something in washington which will be seen as her receipt call and gingrich going off and making no sense. the contract of america, the balanced budget, welfare reform. i participated my career, reagan's economics defeat of the society yef empire. i'm proud of the number of things i participated in that made no sense in washington. by thomas wolf. this goes book i think to the '60s when he first wrote it. now wolf is try, to describe a particular pattern in san francisco. in which the welfare department figured out that all of the senior welfare people should be on the second floor of the welfare office hiding from people that they serve. and the newest, least paid people should be on the
. >> i hope they just don't watch the show. neil: that will do it, thank you for watching. be prosperous and safe and be loved. goodnight. kids, i'm on my way. that's all the "money" we have for you tonight. merry christmas, everyone. ♪ pass backhaul gerri: hello, everybody, i am gerri willis. it has been a tumultuous year for the markets. weak economic growth, and of course the election itself. some analysts picking games 2013 as much as 14% of the market and others lost as much as 14%. it is not working for me today. i think we should talk about else.i'g i will get to talk about a santa claus rally. ral is there a santa claus rally?ra will we have a true santa claus rally? >> listen, think it'll b it wile tough to get one this year. i think there will be a lot of repositioning in portfolios coming toward the end of the year. a people are getting very nervous about the fiscal cliff. i was on the show a couple of weeks ago whe and i was not a tn concerned because i thought we would get a deal done.al it is starting to hurt people.ut a good call by you. frankly, gerri, that is what will
in a lifetime. people like this don't exist very often. and they rarely get the opportunity to make movie muse calls. so you just, and because we were live t was the opening night and closing night every day. so it was that thing of, okay. on my day, let's just pray today's the day. >> rose: just for somebody that may not be familiar with the story, what is the story we're talking about here. >> hugh plays a convict jean valjean who has been put in jail for stealing a loaf of bread at the age of 18, 19 and he has just done nine years hard labor in a convict camp and we meet him on the day of his release. and the prison guard say guy called-- played by russell crowe who when he releases him said you are on parole and just in case you think parole is freedom, parole as a dangerous man means you will be under the watch of the law forever-- forever. and we watch this extraordinary journey that jean valjean goes where this man has lost all kind of hope in humanity, and has building brutallized by the system, tries to survive and he steals some some silver from a bishop who is kind to him. and an am
that experience with me. >> merry christmas to all of the homeless around the world. don't ever give up on life. life is what comes at you and you have to make it at it comes. >> what is christmas? it's another day. it's another day. >> reporter: many visitors at the sir francis drake hotel and this legendary attraction greets people right at the door. >> welcome to the sir francis drake! >> i got started back in 1986. i graduated from san francisco school. >> i think there's 22 uniforms. >> how are you guys doing? nice to see. >> you 32 years? >> yes. >> that's a lot. >> good to see you guys. all right, guys. taxi? i will give you this one in a moment. here's a taxi for you. >> have a nice day. you carry up to 200 to 1,000 suitcases. >> here you go. >> okay. want this back here? >> taxi today? >> tom is the bomb. [laughter] already >> he is excellent. >> i love to look at him. >> look at his hat. i would put him on my christmas tree. [laughter] >> class act, huh? >> you can get your photos taken 500 times a day. you have to look good on the job. >> let me get a picture of my puppy. >> good sh
, as a professor once said, he was doing a lot. what he was really doing was keeping us out of war. and you don't get credit for things that don't happen. but he for eight years, got us out -- we were in korea when we got in, he got us out by bluffing, basically. >> brinksmanship. >> threatening to use the bomb and other things. then he spent the next eight years at a scary, dangerous time. the cold war is getting going, nuclear weapons are new things, communist threats all over the place. he basically bluffed our way through eight years. we didn't lose any soldiers, department get into any wars, stayed out of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking
into this cycle. i don't know if staff has an indication of when that mike be happening. >> a few months. >> thanks. next item on the agenda is discussion and possible action on the amendments to the ordinance. >> nobody is a stranger to the subject matter in front of us. the commission made some progress and combing through input from the sunshine ordinance task force and the staff's updated and redirected recommendations and then once again, after the last time the commission discussed this, staff has put together sort of a chronology of what has happened so far, and tried to distill all of the direction from the commission into a set of decision points to help us to finish this. and then move to getting the dregs into effect. there are eight decision points in front of you to go through the last few more housekeeping than anything else. but we're ready to answer any questions the commission has as they go through these. >> my thought was to begin by taking one decision point at a time. there may be somewhere we can consolidate, like mr. st. croix was saying towards the end and we w
, many of the people share your opinion that they don't want us to have tasers. i examined various recommendations and reports from across the country as to how to most prudently get less lethal options, responsibility in the hands of officers and if you look at the perpstudies and other outlets it was that they were not recommended that they go out wholesale to a police department for then you do see a spike or various officers go to that device first, verses using the other things. so, after we had the first thing that we did when i became chief was initiated a policy asking officers to basically slow down, to back up, call the super superviser to the scene and called the officers who have a greater expertise in dealing with people in crisis. and we have been very, successful over my time as chief in dealing with folks who are only a danger to themselves and this prescribed policy of slowing down and engaging has gotten the folks the help that they needed. unfortunately earlier this year there was a person in crisis who was not only a danger to himself but had harmed another per
for bikes. i ride bikes myself. i just don't feel this is the right way to do it without getting the right study done. thank you. >> i apologize, i have a little bit of a cold. i live in the neighborhood. i can echo a lot of the other constituents that our concern with young kids and a family is yes, you ride bikes and it's an integral part. but when you look at san francisco and how the city interacts and the infrastructure these are key areas for both a residential, commercial, and also distribution of thoroughfares through the city so major changes in how it's structured could have a dramatic and material impact on how people get to work and how the city flows. so i think it is important -- as of now, no one really has a thorough understanding of what the impact would be because practically no studies have been done. so before we really make major changes, it is important to go through the steps. and don't put ourselves in a position where we make a -- harmful impact by eliminating some of the major thoroughfares through the city. >> good evening. my name is -- 7:30 pm last night divisa
it was a unanimous choice. so, it seems like we still don't have sfmta's ear for community input. and i'd like to encourage the organization to spend more time and concerns. i think you're going to get a good start today. but the things you have on your agenda you're going to be voting on options 3 or 4 or possibly falling back to option 1. and i think 3 or 4 would probably be reasonable. i just wanted to say if these fall through and you decide to revert back to option 1, i think you'll have a lot of opposition in north beach again [inaudible]. >> thank you, sir. >>> and just as a last comment, please do stop, reinitiate communication with the neighbor. >> thank you. [speaker not understood]. >> stephen taylor, [speaker not understood]. >>> good evening. my name is stephen tabor. central task force, i'm also the transportation chair for russian hill neighbors. you'll be hearing from russian hill neighbor president so i will confine my remarks to spur. spur has supported this project vigorously since its inception. we have supported the four corridors plan which is based on this
. >> imagine. that's very encouraging to people. to know that if your first 10 books don't sell, that's okay. but i think it says something about your determination. >> mulish obstinate sea. they think it is a fact that because a lot of people start writing a novel, particularly journalists have a novel in the jury. when you start writing your first novel is a new experience you get the names and say you have brown eyes and then you get to page 50 or 100 probably nobody's ever going to read this. when i got to that stage, i thought the heck with that. i'll finish the thing. they have that streak of obstinate sea this is now going going to finish it. >> in the news business were discouraged from making things better. and of course you have to make everything out. [laughter] >> almost everything. ever since i is benito, the first book i researched. i was born in 1949 so i have no memories and so i had to find out what everyday life is like during the war for people in the u.k., which is for the story of a set. so i researched it and never sent then i realized that that works for me to write a
and spent almost two years, people have been -- some have been forcibly relocated. and i don't know exactly why that many people are living like that. elections and we have a new government. a lot of it is promised has not come through. but people have individual efforts and how, in some ways -- they have picked themselves up last week that they can. but it is a question that we have to keep asking and something that we have to model allows people to get that for example, hurricane sandy 80 people are not happy with what he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in en
in the 20th century. don't tread on us. get off our well-armed backs. there's nothing you can do. of course there is. register all guns, license all gun owners. require stringent background checks. get tough on assault weapons of ankind. crack down on high capacity ammunition, as the president has now proposed. then, enforce the laws. yes, i know. determined killers will always find a way, but we can minimize the opportunities and scale back the scope of destruction. why do we accept the need for driver's licenses or submit to the sometimes humiliating body scans at airports? because it's the law, and deep down we know we're safer for the inconvenience of the law. good laws are hard to come by. civilization, just as hard. the rough and tumble of politics makes them so. but democracy aims for a moral order as just as humanly possible, which means laws that protect the weak and not just the strong. lest we forget. >>> we've seen throughout our history what happens when politics doesn't work, when democracy breaks down. the greatest, most heartbreaking problem was the failure toll solve slaver
. >> and "washington post" columnist, jonathan capehart. thank you all so much for being with us. and why don't we just start really quickly with the story of the year, mika. and that, of course, barack obama wins, the republicans lose. and in a way that perhaps is more telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does. and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year, in the past week or so. which is the massacre at the elementary school in sandy hook, newtown. those are the stories that barnicle and andrew have chosen as the top stories of 2012 to cover. mike barnicle, would you agree, that this could be his signature for his second term? >> i do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of th
would be happen i don't to follow up with mr. williams and any other representatives of twu on this issue. >> could you call 16. >> management transition discussion, this is an information item >> colleagues, as it was noted earlier, as you know we have our executive director who will be retiring from the agency at the end of this calendar year. just wanted to have a discussion as to what process we should follow in remaining a permanent new executive director and just note that as indicated earlier, under the administrative code that governors the county transportation authority, when there is a vacantcy in the position, the chief deputy steps in and informs the duties of the executive director, until such time until the board actually appoints a permanent replacement. once his retirement becomes effective, lombardo as chief deputy will slip in and assume the responsibilities after the executive director. so i am confident that as we figure out how to proceed in terms of finding a replacement that the work of the agency will continue and that miss lumbardo and her senior te
you have done. >> supervisor kim, i also want to add a few words for myself. fee i don't evenna you [spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take a moment to colleagues remind you that you started the conversation around reforms year ago and conducted many meetings and trying to reform the jeopardia and the biz tax that we reformed just this last november and i remember having conversation with you about that before i joined this board in the small business commission and thank you for putting that idea in my head. i know that you have had tremendous service in sacrament toe and i hope and believe that you will continue to public service in years to come and hope to work pa with you in that capacity and i want to thank you on my behalf. >> thank you very much we are so happen to be here to acknowledge all of the work that you have done and i have to say in our own distribution, fee i don't
, freaking them out when they don't expect it. >> they don't expect frosty to move around. >> at one point the cameraman says, can you fix this for me? >> they still are surprised. i love this couple. tells you a lot about their relationship. >> bailed on her, left her to the snowman. >> pushed her toward it. >> protect your woman. >> he's not going to take a bullet for you, honey. i love this one in slow motion. >> i love when this little kid comes up to him. >> he was nice to the little guy. >> see, this is why we like rich. >> just be nice to the little ones. >> need to send a belated christmas gift? we have just the thing. >> hello and welcome to fart by mail. >> how you can let one rip miles away. >> home alone doggie style. >> i love these fun toys that come out once a year. >> see what the >>> just in time for christmas, the perfect way to tell someone special they are, in fact, special to you. >> hello and welcome to fart by mail. >> did i hear him say fart by mail? this is a new way to let someone know they are important to you. you can send them flatulence by mail. >> like an act
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